myampgoesto11:

Video stills from Mircea Cantor's Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

2012
4 minutes 
HD film 
Sound: Semantron of Putna Monastery

Part of the 19th Biennale of Sydney 21 March-9 June 2014

watch the full video here

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

12:00 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 2841  |
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owlsmall:

oupacademic:

Are you a shipper? Whom do you ship? "Ship" enters Oxford Dictionaries Online.

Ship, verb: “Support or have a particular interest in a romantic pairing between two characters in a fictional series, often when this relationship is one portrayed by fans rather than depicted in the series itself.”

Find out which other words were added to the May 2014 Oxford Dictionaries Online update.

Image: ©Sarawut Aiemsinsuk via Shutterstock.

OMFG WHAT.

  12:00 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 3318  |
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kateordie:

radiospringy:

thoughtnami:

moonanimate:

Enjoy. :)

Well, it’s finally completed. Fans all across the internet using their individual styles to create a recreation of an episode of Sailor Moon. Not too shabby. 

Congratulations to all involved.

Oh shit! I did one scene in this! Go watch it!

This is amazing on every level.

07:59 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 39666  |
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mockeryd:

artofdavidkawena:

"HUMAN/NATURE"

by David Kawena
#ArtOfDavidKawena

For more, join me on facebook: facebook.com/david.kawena

DAT

ASS

I really like the direction Disney’s taking these days…

07:53 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 5128  |
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food52:

Food & Wine proves you don’t need an ice cream maker.

(via foodandwine)

I have a mighty need to make ice cream or sorbet maybe…. O_o

07:38 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 2298  |
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princehamlette:

IS ANYONE HERE A RUNNER?

i think i want to take up running because i hit a major plateau in my weight loss and i am all soft and stuff. any tips? should i do other exercise too? what do you do? what is your routine?

I’m not a runner but I try. Like today I did 3kms and it totally sucked, I did more walking then running, but I was out there, my heart rate was up, so I count that as a win. I use the Nike Training app and the Nike running app for workouts and run tracking. I thoroughly enjoy using these apps to get my activity levels up. But there are so many free apps out there (in the apple store) that might suit your needs better. I hear the Zombie Run app is supposed to be fun…

09:29 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 8  |
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thebestpersonherelovesbucky:

Look at the last gif. Right after Steve has called The Winter Soldier by a name something about him changes. It’s slight, just a shift in the cold, hard and determined personality we’ve come to know in the Winter Soldier, but it’s there. He hesitates, falters even. In that instant, he stops being the Winter Soldier. Because the Winter Soldier does not hesitate. Does not falter. Does not stop until his mission is complete. No, he’s not Bucky there, but neither is he the Winter Soldier.

When Steve gives him that name, a name the Winter Soldier quite honestly doesn’t know at all, he also gives him something he’s been denied for decades. Steve gives him an identity. I highly doubt the Winter Soldier knows that’s what he’s been given, but he knows that something about him has changed. Here is this man, the target the Winter Soldier been sent to kill, that has probably given him the biggest problem in all his missions, and he stops his fighting to call him by a name. That probably doesn’t make any sense at all to the Winter Soldier—why would someone stop fighting him just to do that, especially when it means nothing to him? But somewhere buried deep inside of him, it means enough to break through Hydra’s programming, even if just for a split second—that second he hesitates. 

12:00 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 1744  |
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adventuretimewithlewis:

shvnyyy-e:

zwamboobs:

blazepress:

Filming a rainbow when suddenly.

Sick

what the fuck

The gays are angry

adventuretimewithlewis:

shvnyyy-e:

zwamboobs:

blazepress:

Filming a rainbow when suddenly.

Sick

what the fuck

The gays are angry

05:57 am, reblogged  by erinltompkins 547722  |
 Comments

(Source: babycocodill)

12:00 pm, reblogged  by erinltompkins 199187  |
 Comments
wonderful

wonderful

(Source: undead4ever)

11:15 am, reblogged  by erinltompkins 109  |
 Comments
This picture was considered akin to porn.  There are several things at work in this photo: a woman as the main focus has her legs up on a writing desk upon which a typewriter appears.  The woman’s appearance and position in the photo is boldly masculine.  Her legs which show her ankles and calves are on display to the (presumably) male viewer.  She also holds a pen and paper in her hand implying that she is a writer and/or educated.  
Behind her there is also a bicycle which to Victorians was a symbol of freedom; especially worrisome was that women latched onto this mode of transportation.  This meant more women were out in the public eye where single men could view single women in un-chaperoned settings.  This also meant that men could approach these women and often these resulted in confrontations as the attentions would be often of the unwelcomed sort.  
The typewriter became the vehicle that granted women entrance into the workforce on a large scale for the first time.  The first typewriting school was in New York in 1881 at the YWCA and the women had to under go a physical assessment in order to determine their ability to “endure” the rigours of the course.  The typewriter was an American export along with the concept of using women as a labour force.     
Some key facts:

The typewriter’s first recorded patent was filed by Henry Mill in 1714, after which many inventors tried many permutations with little or no success until Remington mass produced its version in 1874.


The Education Act of 1870 opened the way for female education. Women’s colleges at Cambridge and Oxford were opened.


The New York branch of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) offers typing classes in 1881 amidst public outcry. Women had to be deemed physically fit in order to endure the demanding “rigours” of the course.


In 1887, Remington sold 14,000 units of their Remington #2 machine. By 1900 Remington sold half a million units. In 1889, 63.8% of clerical workers were women (American stats) (Hoke 77).


The typewriter girl was an American export. British markets were slow to adopt the machines, and the women as typists.


Janet Hogarth (married name was Janet Elizabeth Courtney) was the Bank of England’s first ever female clerk in 1893, and highly educated with first-class honours in Philosophy from Oxford. She sorted cancelled bank notes all day. She said, “It was almost unbelievably soothing to sit in the quiet upper room with nothing to do but lay out banknotes in patterns like patience cards” (Messenger web)


Typewriter girls weren’t allowed loose at lunch for fear of what might happen! As one male worker at the Bank of England said, “The streets it was held were safe enough, but once she the woman clerk entered this forbidding fortress every imaginable horror was predicted” (Messenger web)

Cultural Implications:  
The feminization of the work force happened fairly quickly after the typewriter’s introduction but the job of typist remained “sex-neutral”. Women were not taking jobs from men, but filling newly created jobs. Women workers were ideal because they only worked until marriage (as per law until 1960s) creating a revolving workforce of girls, who wouldn’t need to be paid very much (about £85/year or $312/year).

The typewriter girl became her own best/worst enemy. Popular literature seized this new woman; she became an “… “unfamiliar sexual type”; indeed, on first sight, she seems more male than female… with distinct overtones of lesbianism…” (Keep “The Cultural Work” 10). The campaign to sexualize the woman worker was to put men at ease with the new visibility women were embracing (Keep “The Cultural Work” 9). This created the notion that the typewriter girl made a habit of sexual misadventures and the rumors would fly when a girl married her boss. However, women’s suffrage groups used the typewriter girl as a way to gain more rights, the right to be seen but “…that is, to be acknowledged as an active participant in the world of social relations, but resists becoming, in the process, a spectacle” (Keep “The Culture Work” 15).

(I did a presentation on the typewriter for my Victorian class of which I have included parts of my handout sheet here.  That class was super awesome.  We had so many great discussions that we hardly left time to talk about the books we were to read!)
Sources:
Hoke, Donald.  ”The Women and the Typewriter: A Case Study in Technological Innovation and Social Change.”  Business History Conference.  N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Feb 2014
Keep, Christopher. “The Introduction of the Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer, 1874.” Branch Collective. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.
—-. “The Cultural Work of the Type-Writer Girl.” Victorian Studies 40.3 (1997): 401-422. Scribd. Web. Jan 27. 2014.
Messenger, Robert. “Women and Typewriters in British Offices.” ozTypewriter. ozTypewriter, Jul. 2013. Web. Jan 27, 2014.
For Further Reading
Cameron, S. Brooke. “Sister of the Type: The Feminist Collective in Grant Allen’s The Type-Writer Girl.” Victorian Literature and Culture, 40. pp 229-244. Print.
Holland, Evangeline. “The Type-writer Girl.” Edwardian Promenade. Edwardian Promenade, Jan 2013. Web. Feb 1, 2014.

 “The Earliest Writing Machines.” Early Office Museum. Early Office Museum. Web. Feb 1, 2014.

This picture was considered akin to porn.  There are several things at work in this photo: a woman as the main focus has her legs up on a writing desk upon which a typewriter appears.  The woman’s appearance and position in the photo is boldly masculine.  Her legs which show her ankles and calves are on display to the (presumably) male viewer.  She also holds a pen and paper in her hand implying that she is a writer and/or educated.  

Behind her there is also a bicycle which to Victorians was a symbol of freedom; especially worrisome was that women latched onto this mode of transportation.  This meant more women were out in the public eye where single men could view single women in un-chaperoned settings.  This also meant that men could approach these women and often these resulted in confrontations as the attentions would be often of the unwelcomed sort.  

The typewriter became the vehicle that granted women entrance into the workforce on a large scale for the first time.  The first typewriting school was in New York in 1881 at the YWCA and the women had to under go a physical assessment in order to determine their ability to “endure” the rigours of the course.  The typewriter was an American export along with the concept of using women as a labour force.     

Some key facts:

  • The typewriter’s first recorded patent was filed by Henry Mill in 1714, after which many inventors tried many permutations with little or no success until Remington mass produced its version in 1874.

  • The Education Act of 1870 opened the way for female education. Women’s colleges at Cambridge and Oxford were opened.

  • The New York branch of the Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) offers typing classes in 1881 amidst public outcry. Women had to be deemed physically fit in order to endure the demanding “rigours” of the course.

  • In 1887, Remington sold 14,000 units of their Remington #2 machine. By 1900 Remington sold half a million units. In 1889, 63.8% of clerical workers were women (American stats) (Hoke 77).

  • The typewriter girl was an American export. British markets were slow to adopt the machines, and the women as typists.

  • Janet Hogarth (married name was Janet Elizabeth Courtney) was the Bank of England’s first ever female clerk in 1893, and highly educated with first-class honours in Philosophy from Oxford. She sorted cancelled bank notes all day. She said, “It was almost unbelievably soothing to sit in the quiet upper room with nothing to do but lay out banknotes in patterns like patience cards” (Messenger web)

  • Typewriter girls weren’t allowed loose at lunch for fear of what might happen! As one male worker at the Bank of England said, “The streets it was held were safe enough, but once she the woman clerk entered this forbidding fortress every imaginable horror was predicted” (Messenger web)

Cultural Implications:  

The feminization of the work force happened fairly quickly after the typewriter’s introduction but the job of typist remained “sex-neutral”. Women were not taking jobs from men, but filling newly created jobs. Women workers were ideal because they only worked until marriage (as per law until 1960s) creating a revolving workforce of girls, who wouldn’t need to be paid very much (about £85/year or $312/year).

The typewriter girl became her own best/worst enemy. Popular literature seized this new woman; she became an “… “unfamiliar sexual type”; indeed, on first sight, she seems more male than female… with distinct overtones of lesbianism…” (Keep “The Cultural Work” 10). The campaign to sexualize the woman worker was to put men at ease with the new visibility women were embracing (Keep “The Cultural Work” 9). This created the notion that the typewriter girl made a habit of sexual misadventures and the rumors would fly when a girl married her boss. However, women’s suffrage groups used the typewriter girl as a way to gain more rights, the right to be seen but “…that is, to be acknowledged as an active participant in the world of social relations, but resists becoming, in the process, a spectacle” (Keep “The Culture Work” 15).

(I did a presentation on the typewriter for my Victorian class of which I have included parts of my handout sheet here.  That class was super awesome.  We had so many great discussions that we hardly left time to talk about the books we were to read!)

Sources:

Hoke, Donald.  ”The Women and the Typewriter: A Case Study in Technological Innovation and Social Change.”  Business History Conference.  N.p., n.d. Web. 3 Feb 2014

Keep, Christopher. “The Introduction of the Sholes & Glidden Type-Writer, 1874.” Branch Collective. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2014.

—-. “The Cultural Work of the Type-Writer Girl.” Victorian Studies 40.3 (1997): 401-422. Scribd. Web. Jan 27. 2014.

Messenger, Robert. “Women and Typewriters in British Offices.” ozTypewriter. ozTypewriter, Jul. 2013. Web. Jan 27, 2014.

For Further Reading

Cameron, S. Brooke. “Sister of the Type: The Feminist Collective in Grant Allen’s The Type-Writer Girl.” Victorian Literature and Culture, 40. pp 229-244. Print.

Holland, Evangeline. “The Type-writer Girl.” Edwardian Promenade. Edwardian Promenade, Jan 2013. Web. Feb 1, 2014.

 “The Earliest Writing Machines.” Early Office Museum. Early Office Museum. Web. Feb 1, 2014.

(Source: myimaginarybrooklyn)

11:05 am, reblogged  by erinltompkins 1532  |
 Comments

macabrekawaii:

oppa-pa:

pardonmewhileipanic:

muerteconleche:

missinglinc:

Wasn’t he yelling at people watching him workout instead of them paying attention to their workout?

Yup

Lol that smile lol

that smile fucks me up so much and i am ok with it

I don’t even like this guy but this is great.

he seems so nice, all the time

(Source: helvetios)

10:23 am, reblogged  by erinltompkins 23618  |
 Comments

While on my walk

  05:39 pm, by erinltompkins  Comments